December 23, 1944 (page 5)

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of planes in today sqdrn. was 8.

Gave them plenty of action too, that’s what they crave.

Capt. Parker[1] who joined us on the 19th was controller, I guess he’ll stay with us for awhile.  What a “phoney” to, you’d think he won the war by himself.

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The boys shot up some big convoy coming toward this way with tanks and troops.[2] Darn good thing the weather changed.  It’s a swell Christmas Present, maybe I’ll get some good sleep tonight now that everything is looking better.[3]

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After the Diary

Footnotes    (↵ returns to text)
  1. Capt. James E. Parker, commander of the Ninth Air Force tactical force attached to the 101 during the siege.  Parker directed the supporting planes via radio to specific areas to strike with aerial bombardment particularly in the northwest and west perimeters.  
  2. Infantrymen on the front would radio into Parker the location of tanks and German troops headed towards Bastogne and Parker would radio the air command and have bombers on the tail of the said tanks within minutes.  After several days of siege, the aerial relief appeared beautifully orchestrated.
  3. Although the situation seemed to be improving, the German commanders surrounding Bastogne had intended to give the surrender of the village to Hitler as a Christmas present.  In truth, the Siege of Bastonge was indeed coming to an end but the Battle of the Bulge was far from over.

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