December 23, 1944 (page 3)

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When I get back to rest camp if I ever do I’m going sleep for days.

Pulled guard last night near the radio, sure was plenty of noise out on the lines.

Jerries try’d to breakthrough again but it’s hopeless for them.[1]  They

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don’t know it but we’re getting hotter and hotter all the time while they are cooling off.[2]

What a magnificent sight to see all those C-47 come in and drop the supplies some landed in at the C.P. too.  I never forget it.[3]

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It almost made me cry.  Sun came low too, could see some of the guys standing in the door as they came over and waved at us.

Don’t think we shout wave and holler too.  Boy the guys sure seem happier now. I took some

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Footnotes    (↵ returns to text)
  1. The Germans made a push on the southern perimeter where the Second Battalion of the 327th Regiment held the line.  On the western perimeter, at about the same time, the Germans overtook an American roadblock at Flamierge.  Company C, manning the roadblock, had falsely identified the Germans as the arrival of the anticipated Fourth Armored Division.   Company C withdrew to a position between Mande St. Etienne and Bastogne.  Upon hearing about the penetration, McAuliffe communicated to Company C that it was the “last withdrawal” (MacKenzie, 189-200).
  2. In military lingo “hot” or “getting hotter” refers to the intensity of artillery against the enemy.  So “cooling off” suggests the Germans were lightening up on tank and mortar bombardment of Bastogne.
  3. When the 241 C-47s flew over Bastogne, the sight meant victory to the encircled 101.  “Men cheered and flung themselves into violent motion, wanting to convey to the pilots a measure of the exultation that stormed in them below (MacKenzie, 187).”

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