December 17, 1944 (page 2)

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The only reserve divisions available to aid the 12th Army Group in the Ardennes were the 101st Airborne and the 82nd Airborne.  The 82nd was ordered to the northern section of the bulge near St. Vith and the 101st was directed towards Bastogne.

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guts in them than I’ve got.[1]

Supply really dishing out the crap to us today.  Picked up an extra pair O.D’s[2] some grenades and a hell of a lot .03 ammo.[3]

Haven’t seen a paper as yet but from the rumor were really hot.  Got No. 1 priority on the roads.[4]  Still don’t know

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where we’re going suppose we’ll get a map when we leave.[5]

Boy those six eggs were good, sure feel like a trooper now.  Somebody gave me a shot of “Cognac.”

All for now honey.

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Footnotes    (↵ returns to text)
  1. Some officers and enlisted men stayed in Mourmelon to form the Division’s rear echelon monitoring administrative and supply duties.
  2. “O.D.s” or Olive Drabs refer to the dark green wool uniform jacket and trousers worn by US troops
  3. Probably meant to be .30 ammo, used in the standard US firearm the M1 carbine .30 caliber longarm (short version of a rifle).
  4. Information about the situation on the front was obscure.  Not even the commanders knew exactly what had happened except the breakthrough had been significant and assistance was urgent.  Approximately 10,000 soldiers from the 101 left camp Mourmelon on the 17th.
  5. The German offensive burst came by such surprise that very few of the commanding officers knew the details of where the Division was headed.  At one point many believed the destination was Werbomont.  Supplies were scrounged together but most men were under-dressed for the winter weather and short on ammunition, arms, and food.

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